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Young people and the Anthropocene

Critical perspectives for well-being, resilience and enterprise

The Anthropocene is primarily a discourse of earth systems sciences. Because humans are by definition driving the causes of the Anthropocene, then the social sciences and humanities must critically engage with debates about these planetary-wide changes and the consequences that ensue.

Well-being, resilience and enterprise are terms often found in policy, academic and community discourses about contemporary populations of children and young people around the globe. These states-of-being are frequently imagined as being able to inoculate individual children and young people against many of the education, training, work and life‚ disruptions that characterise the start of the 21st century. 

We need to find new ways of thinking through and understanding the unfolding crisis of planetary environmental systems. This conference brings together academics, activists, artists and the informed public to develop divergent forms and methods of communicating, with the aim toward instigating an international agenda for collaborative knowledge production and exchange. 

https://​young​peo​plean​thro​pocene​.org/​c​o​n​f​e​r​e​n​c​e​-​v​i​d​e​o​s​-​p​r​e​s​e​n​t​a​t​ions/

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People


Peter Kelly is Professor of Education and Head of UNESCO UNEVOC at RMIT University. His recent former role was as Associate Dean, Research and Innovation, in the School of Education at RMIT. Previous positions include at Edge Hill University (UK), Deakin University, Monash University, the University of Queensland (UQ).

Kelly is a social researcher who has published extensively on young people, social theory and globalisation. His current research interests include a critical engagement with young people and new cultures of education/​work/​democracy in the context of the aftermath of the Global Financial Crisis, and with the challenges associated with the emergence of the Anthropocene. He is currently the lead CI on an ARC Discovery Project (DP 170100547) Art Based Social Enterprises and Marginalised Young People’s Transitions.

With colleagues, Kelly leads a research program titled Young People’s Well-being, Resilience and Enterprise: Critical Perspectives for the Anthropocene: https://​young​peo​plean​thro​pocene​.org/

Kelly has published extensively on young people and the practice of youth studies. His books include: Working in Jamie’s Kitchen: Salvation, Passion and Young Workers (2009), The Self as Enterprise: Foucault and the Spirit” of 21st Century Capitalism (2013), The Moral Geographies of Children, Young People and Food: Beyond Jamie’s School Dinners (2014), A Critical Youth Studies for the 21st Century (2015), Young People and the Aesthetics of Health Promotion: Beyond Reason, Rationality and Risk (2016), and Neo-Liberalism and Austerity: The Moral Economies of Young People’s Health and Well-Being (2017). He has two recently published books: Rethinking Young People’s Marginalisation: Beyond neo-Liberal Futures? (2018), Young People and the Politics of Outrage and Hope (2018).